We’re getting ready for the pollinators – Spring!

Purple Poppy Mallow - March 2014

Purple Poppy Mallow – March 2014


It’s officially the first day of Spring!
It might not look like much to most folks, but I was doing a happy dance when I saw the purple poppy mallow in the Cherry Creek Pollinator Habitat starting to send up new leaves. This native wildflower will bloom from late spring through summer. It thrives in disturbed areas, along roadsides, ditches and overgrazed areas. In the garden, it is a sprawling plant full of beautiful magenta flowers.

While the purple poppy mallow is doing well, we’re going to have to replant the white clover. The local rabbits took care of our patch over the winter to the point where it won’t recover. Good thing I have plenty in my yard to share!

Also on our “to-do” list: Move the bee nest box structure outdoors, a stream clean-up and start expanding the habitat to the west. We have a lot to do!

We put together some information to help you attract pollinators to your landscape, along with the directions to make your own bee nest boxes…. You have plenty of time to make your own nest boxes and get them outdoors!

http://lancaster.unl.edu/pest/resources/354Pollinators.pdf

Here’s to Sharing the Buzz!

Soni

UNL Extension provides research-based information to help you make informed decisions any time, any place, anywhere – http://lancaster.unl.edu

Advertisements

Landscaping for Pollinators – Nebraska Statewide Arboretum

Insect hotel in pollinator habitat.

Insect hotel in pollinator habitat.

Our friend and colleague, Kendall Weyers from the Nebraska Statewide Arboretum, recently wrote a nice article on landscaping with pollinators….Thanks Kendall!

Kendall – “Mention pollinators in the landscape, and the first thought of most homeowners is the butterfly. Everyone loves to see this beautiful creature floating on a summer breeze, and some gardeners select plants specifically for them.”

“Yet it is important to remember there is a long list of pollinators beyond butterflies. A wide range of bees, beetles, moths, flies, ants, birds and even bats all play an important role in pollination. Unfortunately these roles and their effectiveness have diminished in our highly fragmented or entirely altered native ecosystems. Weather changes, heavy use of non-native plants and pesticide use also have contributed to the decline of pollinators.”

Be sure to visit the Nebraska Statewide Arboretum Web site and blog for more information on pollinators, plants and our landscapes. http://arboretum.unl.edu/

Enjoy!

Here’s to Sharing the Buzz!

Soni

UNL Extension provides research-based information to help you make informed decisions any time, any place, anywhere – http://lancaster.unl.edu